The lost bayou: The United Houma Nation

A series about South Louisiana’s disappearing communities

Before gumbo, Zydeco and the multicultural influences that shaped today’s modern South Louisiana culture, the people of the United Houma Nation inhabited this land and nearby regions. One of the many native peoples, their rich culture influenced many aspects of the bayou region today.

Originally from Mississippi, the tribe were mound builders that go back thousands of years. Over time, war, colonization and prejudice pushed the tribe into Louisiana and eventually to the Louisiana coast.

The six parishes where most of the 19,000-member tribe now lives line the Gulf of Mexico and, with that, are threatened by hurricanes, rising sea levels, coastal erosion and other environmental risks created by companies like oil and gas. Their land is disappearing.

SPRING 2021 STAFF

Addie Wetzel

Managing Editor

Kirsten Angelette

PR Director

Kacie Fields

Podcast Editor

Jade Hawkins

Photo Editor

Jillian Landry

Copy Editor

Dylan McElroy

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Elise Theriot

Design Editor

Jade Williams

Features Editor

Madeleine Bauland

Staff

Amanda Eschete

PR Staff

Brody Gannon

Staff

Brendan Landry

Staff

Loryn Monceaux

Staff

Hannah Orgeron

Staff

Maegen Rivet

Staff

Robbie Trosclair

Staff
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This issue ranked 12th in the 2022 Hearst Journalism Awards Team Multimedia Competition — Digital News/Enterprise category.